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FDA Approves Amgen’s PCSK9 Drug Repatha

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Repatha (evolocumab) injection for some patients who are unable to get their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol under control with current treatment options.

Repatha, the second drug approved in a new class of drugs known as PCSK9 inhibitors, is approved for use in addition to diet and maximally-tolerated statin therapy in adult patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH), homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), or clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, such as heart attacks or strokes, who require additional lowering of LDL cholesterol.

Familial hypercholesterolemia (encompassing both HeFH and HoFH) is an inherited condition that causes high levels of LDL cholesterol. A high level of LDL cholesterol in the blood is linked to cardiovascular or heart disease. Heart disease is the number one cause of death for Americans, both men and women. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year– that equals one in every four deaths.

“Repatha provides another treatment option in this new class of drugs for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia or with known cardiovascular disease who have not been able to lower their LDL cholesterol enough with statins,” said John Jenkins, M.D., director of the Office of New Drugs, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Cardiovascular disease is a serious threat to the health of Americans, and the FDA is committed to facilitating the development and approval of effective and safe drugs to address this important public health problem.”

Repatha is an antibody that targets a specific protein, called PCSK9. PCSK9 reduces the number of receptors on the liver that remove LDL cholesterol from the blood. By blocking PCSK9’s ability to work, more receptors are available to get rid of LDL cholesterol from the blood and, as a result, lower LDL cholesterol levels.

The efficacy and safety of Repatha were evaluated in one 52-week placebo-controlled trial and eight 12-week placebo-controlled trials in participants with primary hyperlipidemia, including two that specifically enrolled participants with HeFH and one that enrolled participants with HoFH. In one of the 12-week studies, 329 participants with HeFH, who required additional lowering of LDL cholesterol despite statins with or without other lipid-lowering therapies, were randomized to receive Repatha or placebo for 12 weeks. Participants taking Repatha had an average reduction in LDL cholesterol of approximately 60 percent, compared to placebo.

The most common side effects of Repatha include nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, flu, back pain, and reactions such as redness, pain, or bruising where the injection is given. Allergic reactions, such as rash and hives, have been reported with the use of Repatha. Patients should stop using Repatha and get medical help if they experience symptoms of a serious allergic reaction.

Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that statins lower the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. A trial evaluating the effect of adding Repatha to statins for reducing cardiovascular risk is ongoing.

Repatha is marketed by Amgen Inc., of Thousand Oaks, Calif.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

 

 

Source: US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Amgen Files for FDA Approval of its Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Drug

amgenTHOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Aug. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced the submission of a New Drug Application (NDA) with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for etelcalcetide (formerly AMG 416) for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis. If approved, etelcalcetide will be the first calcimimetic agent that can be administered intravenously at the end of the dialysis session.

“Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a serious, progressive disease that can lead to significant clinical consequences and is also associated with a high pill burden for patients,” said Sean E. Harper, M.D., executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. “We look forward to working with regulatory authorities during the review process to bring this important treatment to market, helping to fill an unmet need for the many patients impacted by this disease.”

Etelcalcetide is a novel calcimimetic agent that suppresses the secretion of parathyroid hormone and is in clinical development for the treatment of SHPT in patients with CKD on hemodialysis. Etelcalcetide is administered intravenously three times per week at the end of each dialysis session. It acts by binding to and activating the calcium-sensing receptor on the parathyroid gland, thereby causing decreases in parathyroid hormone (PTH). Sustained elevations in PTH are known to be associated with significant clinical consequences for patients with CKD.

The submission includes data from three Phase 3 studies, all of which met the primary endpoints, including two pooled placebo-controlled trials in more than 1,000 patients and a head-to-head study evaluating etelcalcetide compared with cinacalcet.

About Secondary Hyperparathyroidism
SHPT is a common and serious condition that is often progressive among patients with CKD, and it affects many of the approximately two million people throughout the world who are receiving dialysis, including 450,000 people in the U.S. The disorder develops early in the course of CKD and usually manifests as increased levels of PTH as a result of increased production from the parathyroid glands (four small glands in the neck). Patients with end stage renal disease who require maintenance dialysis often have substantial elevations of PTH that are commonly associated with abnormal calcium and phosphorus levels and an increased risk of significant clinical consequences.

About Etelcalcetide (AMG 416)
Etelcalcetide is a novel calcimimetic agent in clinical development for the treatment of SHPT in CKD patients on hemodialysis that is administered intravenously at the end of the dialysis session. Etelcalcetide binds to and activates the calcium-sensing receptor on the parathyroid gland, thereby decreasing PTH levels.

About Sensipar® (cinacalcet)
Sensipar® (cinacalcet) is the first oral calcimimetic agent approved by the FDA for the treatment of SHPT in adult patients with CKD on dialysis. Sensipar is not indicated for use in adult patients with CKD who are not on dialysis because of an increased risk of hypocalcemia. The therapy is also approved in the U.S. for treatment of hypercalcemia in adult patients with parathyroid carcinoma and hypercalcemia in adult patients with primary HPT for whom parathyroidectomy would be indicated on the basis of serum calcium levels, but who are unable to undergo parathyroidectomy. Sensipar binds to the calcium-sensing receptor, resulting in a drop in PTH levels by inhibiting PTH synthesis and secretion. In addition, the reductions in PTH lower serum calcium and phosphorus levels.

Important Safety Information
Sensipar® (cinacalcet) treatment initiation is contraindicated if serum calcium is less than the lower limit of the normal range (8.4 mg/dL).

Sensipar® lowers serum calcium; therefore, it is important that patients are carefully monitored for the occurrence of hypocalcemia. Life threatening events and fatal outcomes associated with hypocalcemia have been reported in patients treated with Sensipar®, including pediatric patients. Decreases in serum calcium can prolong the QT interval, potentially resulting in ventricular arrhythmia. Cases of QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia secondary to hypocalcemia have been reported in patients treated with Sensipar®.

Significant reductions in calcium may lower the threshold for seizures. Patients, particularly those with a history of seizure disorder, should be carefully monitored for the occurrence of low serum calcium or symptoms of hypocalcemia.

In Sensipar® postmarketing use, isolated, idiosyncratic cases of hypotension, worsening heart failure, and/or arrhythmia were reported in patients with impaired cardiac function. The causal relationship to Sensipar® therapy could not be completely excluded and may be mediated by reductions in serum calcium levels.

Adynamic bone disease may develop if intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels are suppressed below 100 pg/mL. Patients with moderate to severe hepatic impairment should be monitored throughout treatment with Sensipar®, as cinacalcet exposure assessed by area under the curve (AUC) was higher than in patients with normal hepatic function. Patients with secondary HPT: Serum calcium and serum phosphorus should be measured within 1 week and PTH should be measured 1 to 4 weeks after initiation or dose adjustment of Sensipar®. Once the maintenance dose has been established, serum calcium and serum phosphorus should be measured approximately monthly, and PTH every 1 to 3 months. Patients with primary HPT or parathyroid carcinoma: Serum calcium should be measured within 1 week after initiation or dose adjustment of Sensipar®. Once maintenance dose levels have been established, serum calcium should be measured every 2 months. In clinical trials of patients with secondary HPT comparing Sensipar® to placebo, the most commonly reported side effects were nausea (31 percent vs. 19 percent), vomiting (27 percent vs. 15 percent), and diarrhea (21 percent vs. 20 percent). In clinical trials of patients with primary HPT and parathyroid carcinoma treated with Sensipar®, the most commonly reported side effects were nausea (63 percent), vomiting (46 percent), and paresthesia (20 percent).

Please see Full Prescribing Information.

About Amgen
Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begins by using tools like advanced human genetics to unravel the complexities of disease and understand the fundamentals of human biology.

Amgen focuses on areas of high unmet medical need and leverages its biologics manufacturing expertise to strive for solutions that improve health outcomes and dramatically improve people’s lives. A biotechnology pioneer since 1980, Amgen has grown to be one of the world’s leading independent biotechnology companies, has reached millions of patients around the world and is developing a pipeline of medicines with breakaway potential.

For more information, visit www.amgen.com and follow us on www.twitter.com/amgen.

SANOFI AND REGENERON ANNOUNCE FDA APPROVAL OF PRALUENT® (ALIROCUMAB) INJECTION, THE FIRST PCSK9 INHIBITOR IN THE U.S., FOR THE TREATMENT OF HIGH LDL CHOLESTEROL IN ADULT PATIENTS

PARIS and TARRYTOWN, N.Y., July 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Praluent® (alirocumab) Injection, the first FDA-approved treatment in a new class of drugs known as PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) inhibitors. Praluent is indicated as an adjunct to diet and maximally tolerated statin therapy for the treatment of adults with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), who require additional lowering of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. The effect of Praluent on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has not been determined.

Praluent is the first and only PCSK9 inhibitor approved in the U.S. and is available in two different doses (75 mg and 150 mg). Both doses of Praluent are available in a single 1 milliliter (mL) injection delivered in a single-dose prefilled pen or syringe that patients self-administer every two weeks.

For patients with high LDL, or bad, cholesterol the primary focus of treatment is to lower their levels, but many patients today do not achieve recommended levels despite lifestyle modifications and treatment with statins,” said Christopher Cannon, M.D., Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Cardiovascular Division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and a member of the Steering Committee for the Phase 3 ODYSSEY clinical trial program. “In the ODYSSEY clinical trial program, two doses of alirocumab showed significant LDL cholesterol lowering in a variety of patients who were not able to adequately lower their LDL cholesterol with current standard of care alone. The majority of patients achieved their LDL-lowering goals with the 75 mg dose, when added to maximally tolerated dose of a statin, with a generally acceptable safety profile.”

Many patients in the U.S. face the challenge of achieving LDL cholesterol levels recommended by healthcare providers, despite treatment with standard of care including statins. These include approximately 8-10 million patients with an inherited form of high LDL cholesterol known as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and those with clinical ASCVD, defined as a build-up of plaque in the arteries which can lead to reduced blood flow and a number of conditions including heart attack, stroke, chest pain (stable or unstable angina), transient ischemic attack, revascularization and peripheral artery disease.

Despite significant progress over the last decades, high cholesterol remains a leading concern in the U.S. and globally,” said Olivier Brandicourt, M.D., Chief Executive Officer, Sanofi. “Praluent demonstrates the power of the Sanofi and Regeneron alliance to deliver a first-in-class therapy in the U.S. for patients in need. Sanofi has a strong cardiovascular heritage and dedication to these patients, and we look forward to working with other regulatory authorities to make Praluent available to patients worldwide.

We are grateful to the thousands of patients and investigators worldwide who participated in the ODYSSEY clinical trial program,” said Leonard S. Schleifer, M.D., Ph.D., Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Regeneron. “Praluent represents the culmination of more than a decade of tireless work to translate the genetic-based discovery of PCSK9 into an innovative medicine that brings meaningful value to patients.

The approval of Praluent was based on data from the pivotal Phase 3 ODYSSEY program, which showed consistent, positive results compared to placebo and included current standard of care therapy (statins). In the ODYSSEY LONG TERM trial which evaluated Praluent 150 mg every two weeks, Praluent reduced LDL cholesterol by 58 percent versus placebo at week 24 when added to current standard of care, including maximally tolerated statins. In ODYSSEY COMBO I, Praluent 75 mg every two weeks as an adjunct to statins reduced LDL cholesterol by an additional 45 percent compared to placebo at week 12. At week 24 in the same trial, Praluent reduced LDL cholesterol by an additional 44 percent compared to placebo. In this study, if additional LDL cholesterol lowering was required based on pre-specified criteria at week 8, Praluent was up-titrated to 150 mg at week 12 for the remainder of the trial. Eighty-three percent of patients remained on their initial 75 mg dose.

Praluent is generally well-tolerated with an acceptable safety profile. Local injection site reactions including redness, itching, swelling, or pain/tenderness, where the injection is given were the most common events (7.2 percent with Praluent vs. 5.1 percent with placebo) and resulted in a low discontinuation rate that was comparable to placebo (0.2 percent with Praluent vs. 0.4 percent with placebo). Patients receiving Praluent had a greater number of injection site reactions, had more reports of associated symptoms, and had reactions of longer average duration than patients receiving placebo. Other common adverse events occurring more frequently in patients with Praluent than placebo included symptoms of the common cold and flu or flu-like symptoms.

The companies carefully considered the potential medical value that Praluent offers patients in determining the Wholesale Acquisition Cost (WAC). The U.S. WAC price of Praluent is $40 per day ($1,120 every 28 days) for both the 75 mg and 150 mg doses, making Praluent the lowest priced patient-administered monoclonal antibody therapy on an annualized basis. Actual costs to patients, payers and health systems are anticipated to be lower as WAC pricing does not reflect discounts or rebates. Out-of-pocket costs to patients will vary depending on insurance status and eligibility for patient assistance.

Sanofi and Regeneron are committed to ensuring that patients in the U.S. who are prescribed Praluent are able to access the medicine and receive the support they may need. The companies will offer a comprehensive program that provides support, training, and follow up for patients at every step of the process. The program will provide patient assistance to uninsured or underinsured patients, including providing free medicine to eligible patients, and can help identify coverage options for out-of-pocket costs. Additional services include educational information, clinical support for physicians, nurses and pharmacists, as well as reimbursement services, including co-pay support for eligible patients and information about insurance eligibility support. For more information, please call 1-844-PRALUENT (1-844-772-5836).

Earlier today, the companies announced that the European Medicine Agency’s (EMA’s) Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has adopted a positive opinion for the marketing authorization of Praluent, recommending its approval for use in certain adult patients with hypercholesterolemia. The European Commission (EC) is expected to make a final decision on the Marketing Authorization Application for Praluent in the European Union in September 2015.

Investor Relations Conference Call on Praluent
Sanofi and Regeneron will be hosting a conference call for the financial community on Praluent® (alirocumab) Injection for the treatment of high LDL cholesterol in adult patients. The conference call will take place on Friday, July 24, 2015 (21:30 CET / 20:30 BST / 15:30 EDT / 12:30 PDT).

The call will be available through audio webcast at www.sanofi.com and www.regeneron.com and also via the following telephone numbers:

France:     +33 (0) 1 70 80 71 53

UK:            +44 (0) 203 107 0289

U.S.:          +1 888 660 6127

ODYSSEY Program
The ODYSSEY Phase 3 program is one of the most comprehensive clinical trial programs ever conducted for an investigational LDL cholesterol lowering therapy. The program includes 14 global Phase 3 trials evaluating more than 23,500 patients. The primary efficacy end point in all of the studies was the mean percent reduction from baseline in LDL cholesterol at week 24 compared to placebo (maximally tolerated statin therapy); all of the completed studies met their primary endpoint. A significantly higher proportion of patients achieved an LDL cholesterol of less than 70 mg/dL in the Praluent group as compared to placebo at both week 12 and week 24. The ongoing ODYSSEY OUTCOMES trial will prospectively evaluate the cardiovascular benefits of Praluent in approximately 18,000 patients.

Important Safety Information
Do not use PRALUENT if you are allergic to alirocumab or to any of the ingredients in PRALUENT.

Before you start using PRALUENT, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including allergies, and if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

Tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist about any prescription and over-the-counter medicines you are taking or plan to take, including natural or herbal remedies.

PRALUENT can cause serious side effects, including allergic reactions that can be severe and require treatment in a hospital. Call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away if you have any symptoms of an allergic reaction including a severe rash, redness, severe itching, a swollen face, or trouble breathing.

The most common side effects of PRALUENT include: redness, itching, swelling, or pain/tenderness at the injection site, symptoms of the common cold, and flu or flu-like symptoms. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Talk to your doctor about the right way to prepare and give yourself a PRALUENT injection and follow the “Instructions for Use” that comes with Praluent.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please click here for the full Prescribing Information

About Sanofi
Sanofi, an integrated global healthcare leader, discovers, develops and distributes therapeutic solutions focused on patients’ needs. Sanofi has core strengths in the field of healthcare with seven growth platforms: diabetes solutions, human vaccines, innovative drugs, consumer healthcare, emerging markets, animal health and the new Genzyme. Sanofi is listed in Paris (EURONEXT: SAN) and in New York (NYSE: SNY).

About Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Regeneron (NASDAQ: REGN) is a leading science-based biopharmaceutical company based in Tarrytown, New York that discovers, invents, develops, manufactures, and commercializes medicines for the treatment of serious medical conditions. Regeneron commercializes medicines for high LDL cholesterol, eye diseases, and a rare inflammatory condition and has product candidates in development in other areas of high unmet medical need, including oncology, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. For additional information about the company, please visit www.regeneron.com.

FDA approves new treatment for chronic hepatitis C genotype 3 infections

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Daklinza (daclatasvir) for use with sofosbuvir to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 infections. Daklinza is the first drug that has demonstrated safety and efficacy to treat genotype 3 HCV infections without the need for co-administration of interferon or ribavirin, two FDA-approved drugs also used to treat HCV infection.

Hepatitis C is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the liver that can lead to diminished liver function or liver failure. Most people infected with HCV have no symptoms of the disease until liver damage becomes apparent, which may take several years. Some people with chronic HCV infection develop scarring and poor liver function (cirrhosis) over many years, which can lead to complications such as bleeding, jaundice (yellowish eyes or skin), fluid accumulation in the abdomen, infections or liver cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 2.7 million Americans are infected with HCV of which, approximately 10 percent are genotype 3.

“Today’s approval provides a new option for patients with genotype 3 HCV, including those patients who cannot tolerate ribavirin,” said Edward Cox, M.D., director of the Office of Antimicrobial Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

The safety and efficacy of Daklinza in combination with sofosbuvir were evaluated in a clinical trial of 152 treatment-naive and treatment-experienced participants with chronic HCV genotype 3 infection. Participants received Daklinza 60 mg plus sofosbuvir 400 mg once daily for 12 weeks and were monitored for 24 weeks post treatment. The studies were designed to measure whether a participant’s hepatitis C virus was no longer detected in the blood 12 weeks after finishing treatment (sustained virologic response), suggesting a participant’s infection had been cured.

Results showed that 98 percent of the treatment-naive participants with no cirrhosis of the liver and 58 percent of the treatment-naive participants with cirrhosis achieved sustained virologic response. Of the participants who were treatment-experienced, 92 percent with no cirrhosis of the liver and 69 percent with cirrhosis achieved sustained virologic response. Daklinza labeling carries a Limitations of Use statement to inform prescribers that sustained virologic response rates are reduced in HCV genotype 3 infected patients with cirrhosis.

Safety information was available for approximately 1,900 patients with HCV treated with the recommended dose of Daklinza in combination with other anti-HCV drugs in clinical trials. The most common side effects of Daklinza with sofosbuvir were fatigue and headache.

Daklinza carries a warning for patients and health care providers that serious slowing of the heart rate (symptomatic bradycardia) and cases requiring pacemaker intervention have been reported when amiodarone is co-administered with sofosbuvir in combination with another HCV direct-acting antiviral, including Daklinza. Co-administration of amiodarone with Daklinza in combination with sofosbuvir is not recommended.

Daklinza was reviewed under the FDA’s priority review program, which provides for an expedited review of drugs that treat serious conditions and, if approved, would provide significant improvement in safety or effectiveness.

Daklinza is marketed by Bristol-Myers Squibb, based in Princeton, New Jersey.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Source: Food and Drug Administration

FDA Expands Approval of Imbruvica for Rare Blood Cancer

gYik8JVToday, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it has expanded approval of Johnson & Johnson and Pharmacyclics’ Imbruvica (ibrutinib) for a rare form of blood cancer.

The agency approved Imbruvica for patients with Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare form of cancer that begins in the body’s immune system. WM is a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), which usually gets worse slowly over time and causes abnormal blood cells, called B lymphocytes (B-cells), to grow within the bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver and spleen. Additionally, in WM abnormal B-cells overproduce a protein known as immunoglobulin M or IgM (macroglobulin) that can lead to excess bleeding, problems with vision and with the nervous system.

Imbruvica was granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation for WM from US health regulators. In addition to WM, Imbruvica is approved for three other indications in the US, including patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) who have received at least one prior therapy, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who have received at least one prior therapy and CLL patients with 17p deletion.

The FDA’s decision to approve Imbruvica for treatment of WM is based on results from a 63-patient study, which showed that 62 percent of participants had their cancer shrink after treatment, with the duration of response ranging from 2.8 months to approximately 18.8 months.

“Since the first description of Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia more than 70 years ago, there has been no approved treatment for this cancer. Rather, doctors relied on therapies borrowed from similar cancers to treat these patients. I am truly grateful to the FDA for their work and dedication of scientists and clinicians at various leading medical centers who diligently worked on the clinical trial that supports Imbruvica as a safe and effective therapy for patients with Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia,” said Steven P. Treon, MD, PhD, Director of the Bing Center for Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, and, who led the trial.

In addition to Breakthrough Therapy, the FDA granted Imbruvica priority review and orphan drug designation for treatment of WM. The agency’s approval comes more than two months ahead of its prescription drug user fee goal date.

“Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia patients and physicians have been waiting for a treatment specifically studied and approved to treat this rare disease,” said Carol Harrington, President of the International Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia Foundation. “The approval of Imbruvica is an important milestone for the entire global WM community and has the potential to positively impact our patients, their physicians and caregivers.”

Source: US Food and Drug Administration; Janssen Biotech, Inc.

FDA Approves New Glucose Monitoring App for Data-Sharing Among Diabetic Patients and Caregivers

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowed marketing of the first set of mobile medical apps that allow diabetics to automatically and securely share data from a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) with other people in real-time.

The Dexcom Share Direct Secondary Displays system’s data-sharing capability allows diabetes patient caregivers to monitor an individual’s blood sugar levels remotely. Other CGMs are also available on the market, however Dexcom Share is the first to receive the FDA’s approval.

The app allows caregivers and families to keep an eye on a diabetes patient’s glucose levels remotely, in order to avoid complications, such as hyperglycemia. The Dexcom Share involves two apps, one which would be downloaded by the patient, who will be able to set up “followers” that can view their information and the second would be downloaded by the caregiver to view the CGM data in real time. The patient can share data with up to five followers.

The system includes a small, wire-like sensor which a patient would insert just under the skin. The device continuously transmits data to a monitor that is worn externally. When used along with a blood glucose meter, CGM information can help diabetes patients detect when blood glucose values are approaching dangerously high and dangerously low levels.

“This innovative technology has been eagerly awaited by the diabetes community, especially caregivers of children with diabetes who want to monitor their glucose levels remotely,” said Alberto Gutierrez, PhD, director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Today’s marketing permission paves the way for similar technologies to be marketed in the United States.”

Dexcom said that it anticipates to ship the Share receiver to new patients in March. This is the first Dexcom system that is mobile compatible without the use of a docking system.

The app was approved under the FDA’s de novo process, which was created for low- to moderate-risk devices, which doesn’t require the same review process as more complicated products. It is the first to receive regulatory approval for US sales since the FDA began regulating mobile medical apps as devices in 2013.

“The Dexcom Share receiver represents a significant step forward for our company and our mobile strategy, but more importantly, it will provide a huge improvement for people managing their diabetes and for those parents and caregivers who help them each and every day,” said Kevin Sayer, President and Chief Executive Officer of Dexcom. “The FDA understands the importance of this type of innovation and the need to regulate it appropriately, and we could not be more pleased with the speed at which they reviewed and approved this important innovation.”

Sources: US Food and Drug Administration; DexCom, Inc.; Specialty Pharma Journal